Colorado Wedding Invitation

source: wordshopdenver.com

in conversation with: Wordshop Paperie

At Wordshop Paperie, their greatest hope is to revive the written word. They favor independent, small studio, paper printers. Whether it’s custom letterpress wedding invitations, personalized stationery for that handwritten note, or business cards to expand your network, they’re here to make your project as unique as you are. Our editor in chief, Felicia Anzaldúa sat down with owner, Jill, and designer, Ray to discuss the future of etiquette, trends, and advice for soon-to-be weds.

At Wordshop Paperie, their greatest hope is to revive the written word. They favor independent, small studio, paper printers. Whether it’s custom letterpress wedding invitations, personalized stationery for that handwritten note, or business cards to expand your network, they’re here to make your project as unique as you are. Our editor in chief, Felicia Anzaldúa sat down with owner, Jill, and designer, Ray to discuss the future of etiquette, trends, and advice for soon-to-be weds.

I love that your intent is so obvious in everything you do, I can tell that having an impact is an important part of your philosophy.


Jill: Ray has been here for four years and is constantly opening my eyes to new things. She recently helped me realize that we don’t always highlight the “what” and “why” behind the business. When I opened the store, it was always my mission to support people like you and me.

Women, small businesses, local makers, people who love community more than they love making a million dollars. As industries have evolved, we’re starting to see more makers from minority communities come forward with their story. We are amongst paper people, detail-oriented people, and people who love the story [behind brands]. We’re always trying to find people and business partners who share the same values.

People still appreciate the joy that comes from texture. I think it allows people to be more intentional with their planning process.

Photo by Steve Stanton Photography

How has your experience been with e-vites and similar tools?

Ray: I think at the end of the day, there are people who don’t value the physical medium, and we understand that. It’s not for everybody, but we strive to create and produce visions that are unique—whether in digital format or print. No matter the medium, we will create something custom for you. Whether it’s a monogram, a custom illustration of the venue, your four-legged friends or something more personal—we can create something uniquely you!

Photo by Michaella Elliot McClendon

There’s a lot of information out there in terms of timelines and etiquette. For Wordshop, when is the most ideal time for someone to book their initial consultation?


Ray: There’s sort of a pre-pandemic response and a present day response to that. One thing the pandemic has taught us all is flexibility—we have learned to adapt. I think the magic with modern wedding invitations is that we are recreating and reinterpreting long-standing etiquette in a way that meets today’s challenges. What used to be a nine-to-12 month timeline for “save the dates” is now within six months. We’re dealing with all these outside circumstances that none of us have ever encountered before. What we’re able to do now as an industry, is to better adapt to and embrace whatever works for the couples.

Jill: I think it’s helpful for the couples too. Instead of spending months and months pinning and saving images, the process is so much more efficient. We’re no longer having to do two, three, or four appointments, which was common in the past.

Ray: I think the process of the last year and a half and the changes we’ve made in terms of timelines, structure and communicating with our people—we’ve just really figured out how to make our time together more efficient.

Do you foresee that trend continuing?

Jill: I do. I think it’s empowering for our couples to finally say, “Hey, we get to make this up as we go along—to make our own rules.

Ray: In the last year, I have had more couples sit at our consult table and say they’re not stressed and that they’re actually enjoying the process. The changes we’ve all experienced have really enabled people to just slow it down.

Jill: Yes, and focus on the finer details and enjoy being able to really personalize and customize their ensemble.

I absolutely love that. It’s interesting to discover a silver lining in all this: just realizing that you can do whatever the heck you want to do. And what happens if we don’t stick to traditional outer/double envelopes, right?

Ray: I think a trend I definitely want to see continue is couples striving to have a wedding where guests leave feeling like they were in the presence of love and got to know the couple just by being there.

I think that’s what makes it so special here and why I love being the designer here. People bring us the most personal of details to incorporate into their weddings.

Jill: They’ll bring that one piece and say, “okay, how can we use this? Here’s the font file. Let me know what we can do with it.” A month ago we had a young woman whose mom loved painting watercolor and she painted scenes from each room of her wedding venue and then we printed those watercolors in the background of all of her pieces. I mean, it goes on and on and on.

Colorado Wedding Invitation
source: wordshopdenver.com

What other trends would you like to see?

Jill: The dissipation of the fear of having to do what they always thought they were supposed to do. I love that.

Ray: One of my favorite details is starting with a couple when they first get engaged and then seeing them return when they’re having their first baby and coming back for those announcements or baby shower invitations.

rustic wedding invitation
source: wordshopdenver.com

You’re, ultimately, one of the first design choices wedding guests get to see. So, you get to set the tone for the entire celebration. How much would you suggest a couple set aside, percentage or dollar-wise, for their invitation suites?


Jill: It is realistic to spend anywhere from $6 per guest for lower-end stocks and printing methods to $12 and up per guest for higher-end paper and letterpress. And everything in between. It truly depends on where our client needs their budget to be.

There is so much flexibility. For example: flat digital printing is more affordable than letterpress. There are options such as thermography versus foil, so you could spend five grand or you could spend $500 and still have something that is lovely, but less involved.

Ray: Absolutely. That’s another thing that I love about this space is you don’t have to give an arm and a leg to create something beautiful. You know, we can do more affordable projects and the paper is still gorgeous. Couples can still create something custom and special to them within their budget.

source: https://www.theaerialistpress.com/print-styles

Do you have any other advice for soon -to-be-weds?


Jill: As the resident wordsmith, I invite our couples to bring in just the bones of the text; the rest we can build in for them. Think about whose names should be included and who is hosting. As much as we are recreating rules and redefining modern etiquette, it’s still important to consider things like inclusivity of family and honoring parents.

Ray: I want people to know a little bit more about the process and to just truly enjoy it. Focus on what matters—which is marrying your love—and do what you like. Do what you love and trust the process. Leave the rest up to us.